Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Just a big love letter to my sourdough starter!




There is a lot of press these days on why bread and wheat are so bad for you and in particular we are seeing a huge rise in gluten intolerance and grain allergies. When I witnessed this, even with one of my own children I was confused, after all mankind has been making bread for thousands of years! How could we all of a sudden lose our tolerance for it?

Been reading and thinking on this a lot lately. It looks like much of this has to do with how we have changed our methods of making bread. Traditionally bread was made from a fermented starter and fermented for a long time. Bread cooked in this method with a long slow fermentation of a wild yeast is actually way gentler on the digestive system, has nutrients more readily available and also even has anti fungal properties that are healthful for building good gut flora. Did I mention it also has an incredibly delicious flavor?
I've been using my starter for a good couple of years now regularly. I bake between one to four loaves of bread a week for my family depending on our consumption and my time in the kitchen. It requires minimal time to mix it and proof it and all the times are flexible, so it fits hectic family life way better than conventional bread baking and it's precise rising times.
I also love the rhythmic feel that sourdough gives to my life. As a child I always preferred sourdough and now as an adult I am so happy to finally make this nourishing food and share it with my children.
- Posted using BlogPress from my iPad

9 comments:

Margaret E. Perry said...

next time i come over, can you teach me how to bake a loaf?

Kelly said...

Would you mind posting your recipe/process? I've tried sourdough several times in the past - I'll get a starter going, but never manage to make a loaf that's doesn't come out brick-like. I've had some starter going for the last week and I think I'm ready to try again. I'd love to know if you have any special tricks.

LeeAnn said...

Mrs Hatke, you might find both these articles about celiac interesting. Not just how the wheat is grown and prepared but a variety of factors, including less exposure to beneficial bacteria.
Happy Holy Thursday to your house!
~LeeAnn Balbirona

http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/Browse/file/GFL_Fasano_interview.pdf

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/24/opinion/sunday/what-really-causes-celiac-disease.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

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Laura said...

And now for sourdough danish pastries <3: http://korenainthekitchen.com/2012/05/20/sourdough-danish-pastries/

Jill said...

I'd love to hear the recipe too for similar reasons to what Kelly said! :)

Anonymous said...

I guess I'll put my request in too for your suggested process just to add some pressure! because I was also wondering if you make your OWN leaven. I've read that using the local spores already around can also be better for digestion. I tried this once and it looked like a successful sponge but then I never got it to the dough or kept up with caring for it. Always intended to try again. Your beautiful bread is inspiring me.Thank you!

Colbyb said...

I've told Mike that I wish we had an authentic boulangerie (?)-bakery, nearby. I've been going to Panera but it gets expensive, so I absolutely can't do that on a regular basis. Firehook in Alexandria seems like the real deal, and alot of artisan breads are popping up, like at North Market, which is a 15 minute drive. Basically, I am too lazy to bake my own, and luckily Mike is willing, and has gotten back into making a loaf daily. It really is a staple, and such a convenience for me to have it available!

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